Houston Newsmakers for July 28: Maternal Mortality, Komen Breast Cancer Research, Sterling Aviation

Why are maternal mortality rates much higher among minority women. That’s the challenge tackled by the Houston Endowment. Dr. Erica Giwa, is the Assistant Professor of obstetrics and gynecology at Baylor College of Medicine’s Center for Children and Women. She is a guest on this week’s Houston Newsmakers with Khambrel Marshall and says many people assume that socio-economics are at the heart of the problem, but not so. read more…

The fight to end Texas’ high maternal mortality rate

Texas made headlines in 2016 after a study claimed the state had the worst maternal mortality rate in the developed world. The study’s numbers turned out to be inflated, but Texas still has one of the most concerning maternal mortality rates in the U.S., particularly among black mothers, who die during childbirth at twice the rate white mothers do. Special Correspondent Kirsty Johansen reports. read more…

In Texas, too many new moms die. Here’s how to stop that. [Opinion]

Houston Chronicle, By Erica Giwa and Stephanie MartonMay 22, 2019 The statistics on maternal mortality in Texas are staggering. For every 100,000 live births, there are between 14.6 and 18.6 maternal deaths. Among black women, who are still severely disproportionately affected, the rate leaps to 27.8 maternal deaths per 100,000 live births. These numbers, according …read more »

Coalition launches to help pregnant women in Third Ward, Sunnyside

A coalition of health organizations launched an initiative Friday to combat maternal mortality and morbidity in the Third Ward and Sunnyside, areas where women die after giving birth at much higher rates than compared to other parts of Harris County.

Healthy Women Houston members said that making sure women are accessing health care during pregnancy and after giving birth is important to reduce risk of death or disease.

Mothers in Peril

A harrowing journey through Houston’s health care system offers an inside look at why so many women are dying after giving birth. A little after dark, Ebonie Chandler finally had a chance to relax. She had spent the past three days trying to enroll her five-year-old daughter, Blessn, in school, only to get the runaround. It was May 20, 2017, and Ebonie and her two youngest children had been living in Houston for a month. read more…

Life-threatening pregnancy complications on the rise in Harris County

Life-threatening, pregnancy-related complications — the iceberg beneath the surface of the U.S. maternal health crisis — are on the rise in Harris County, according to a new report. The report not only confirmed the Harris County rate is worse than that of the state and nation, it found that it increased more than 50 percent between 2008 and 2015. Texas’ rate of life-threatening, pregnancy-related complications went up 15 percent in the same time period. read more…

Harris County moms suffer preventable pregnancy complications at unacceptable rates [Editorial]

A University of Texas study this past fall on severe maternal morbidity — the clinical term for serious pregnancy complications — found that Texas mothers had a rate higher than the national average. Though Harris County boasts some of the world’s best hospitals and research centers, the morbidity rate here jumped an astounding 53 percent between 2008 and 2015. That year, 2.4 percent of Harris County pregnancies had severe complications, the study found. read more…

Texas isn’t the ‘worst,’ but moms are still dying

It’s good news that Texas’ maternal mortality rate is much lower than previously believed, allowing the Lone Star State to shed the shameful, and apparently erroneously bestowed, distinction of having one of the highest rates in the world. The bad news is that women are still dying. read more…

Texas pregnancy-related deaths inflated, new study finds

Texas’ crisis of pregnancy-related deaths is not nearly as bad as previously reported, according to a new study. The new data, calculated by state health officials and published in the journal Obstetrics & Gynecology Monday, found the actual number of maternal deaths is less than half that reported in a 2016 study that drew national attention to the issue in Texas. read more…